All posts by Robert

Seven Segment Display

A large scale text device in the shape of the seven segment led, this scupture investigates the relationship between bodily experience and linguistic perception. The device is made from fluorescent shop lights, is fully programmable and controllable via computer terminal, and can be sent any variety of text. It is a surrogate electronic voice, delivering textual utterances on a grand scale (referencing corporate signage), suggesting large technological infrastructure (such as mainframe computers and server farms), and rendered partially incomprehensible due to its scale and the limits of its form. The piece creates a seductive sensory experience which invites the viewer to work deciphering coded messages.

Typically a numeric display, the seven segment form is severely limited in rendering text. I am interested in these formal limitations because of the resulting demands the piece makes on flexibility of perception for both viewer and writer. Communication through the Seven Segment Display requires understood conventions of abbreviation in the same manner as SMS messaging and the visual morphology of 1337 speak. Compounding this difficulty, the large scale of the piece makes perception an issue of physical perspective—up close the sculpture is more readily understood as sensory/perceptual experience than read as legible text. The viewer’s positioning of their body becomes instrumental in their interpretation of the piece.

seven segment display from Robert Twomey on Vimeo.

Natural Love at Sixteen:One Gallery

Sixteen:One proudly presents NATURAL LOVE

New works by: Robert Twomey and Les Lawrence
Organized by Sara Hunsucker.

Opens Saturday, January 26th and runs through February 23rd.
An opening reception for the artists will be held Saturday January 26th from 7-10pm.

The point of departure for Natural Love is the evolution of the relationship between man and beast. Civilization once depended on animals for their ability to provide: food, clothing, labor and transportation. Cultures worship, sacrifice, and examine animals, and use them as stand-ins for humans in scientific experimentation. No longer wild, but still subservient, domesticated animals are so integrated into our lives as to become extensions of our own identities. They act as others so that we may define ourselves as caretakers and companions. We count on them as our sweethearts, saviors, and surrogates. Pets bare a burden of our imposed anthropomorphization. They do their best to retain their dignity in our grotesque patronizations, dressing them up, baby talking to them, and parading them around in designer carriers and rhinestone collars. It is loyalty, forgiveness, and mutual dependence that constitute our natural love.

Robert Twomey’s oil paintings are based on found fliers of disappeared cats from his neighborhood. These works illuminate public expressions of private attachments, and lament the loss of irreplaceable love. Taken as source materials, the artist is implicated in the process of recovery of the missing by removing the fliers for his purposes. Both honoring and interrupting, Twomey creates haunting, sad, and even humorous work.

Les Lawrence’s work investigates and critiques the nature of interspecies relationships. He presents an installation of his beloved twelve-month-old turtle, Crackshell in his habitat. Lawrence also exhibits evocative new photos of pets with their masters and mistresses. This work addresses contemporary cultural phenomenon of our animal attractions in relation to our particular time and space.

Sixteen:One is an art space organized by Los Angeles-based artist, Allison Whitney. Located at 2116-b Pico Blvd in Santa Monica, CA, the space features an ongoing series of contemporary art exhibitions. Gallery hours are Thursday, Friday, and Saturday, 11 – 5 p.m., and by appointment. For information, call 310.450.4394, or www.16to1.com.

http://crca.ucsd.edu/view_event.php?id=110

COMPASS 2007

I have  three pieces in the COMPASS 2007 show at UC Riverside / California Museum of Photography.

COMPASS 2007

Wednesday, August 1, 2007
Noon–5 p.m.
Wednesday, September 5, 2007
Noon–5 p.m.

Location: UCR ARTSblock located in the 3800 block of Main Street, Downtown Riverside
Category: Exhibition


Description: Compass 2007: New Art from the University of California’s MFA Programs

Compass 2007 is a survey exhibition that will present work by art MFA students who will be graduating from UC Art Departments in June 2007. The eight out of the ten UC campuses with art departments that will be included are UC Berkeley, UC Davis, UC Irvine, UC Los Angeles, UC Riverside, UC Santa Barbara, UC Santa Cruz, and UC San Diego. The exhibition will look at the impact of UC MFA programs, explore the differences and similarities between northern and southern California, and measure the influence certain faculty have on artistic production. Encompassing over 6000 square feet, the exhibition will be presented in both the UCR/California Museum of Photography and UCR Sweeney Art Gallery, two of three components that will form the newly created UCR ARTSblock, located on Main Street, a pedestrian walkway, in downtown Riverside. This will be the first exhibition in recent history to encompass all of the University of California’s art departments, and to build a bridge between northern, central, and southern California art scenes. Brochure and online catalogue will be available. Co-curated by UCR/California Museum of Photography Curator of Exhibitions, Ciara Ennis, and UCR Sweeney Art Gallery Director, Tyler Stallings. Compass: 2007 is organized by UCR ARTSblock.

Additional Information:


Open to: Public. ARTSblock hours: 12-5 Tuesday-Saturday. Open until 9 PM on the first Thursday of every month. Closed Sundays and Mondays.
Admission: Free
Sponsor: Sweeney Art Gallery

Contact Information:
Shane Shukis
951-827-3755
shane.shukis@ucr.edu

http://events.ucr.edu/cgi-bin/display.cgi?event_id=19647